Advancing sexuality studies course (ASSC)

Share

The short course is comprised of a set of modules designed for use either as a stand-alone teaching tool, as part of the full short course or for incorporation into other courses. Each module listed below contains: Module Outline, Facilitator Notes and a PowerPoint presentation for participants. IASSCS has made this material available through the Creative Commons license which enables the free sharing and use of information and materials.

If you want to access the module content, please login first with your IASSCS profile. 

We are presenting the modules of the courses already delivered:

1) La Trobe-ARCSHS short course modules.

Here is the list of the course documentation. Every module contains the module outline, the facilitator notes, the module academic content and the module handouts.  If you want to access the complete files and download them, please log in with your IASSCS profile.

Course preparation documentation: Five course preparation documents intended as a brief overview of the modules.

- Introduction: module providing an overview of Advancing Sexualities Studies: A short course on sexuality theory and research methodologies. It contains a brief background, along with a summary of an audit of sexuality studies undertaken as part of the short course development process.

- Biopower and Sexuality: This module analyzes foucaltian concepts like ‘biopower’, ‘governmentality’, ‘technologies of the self’ and 'technologies of the self’ that have been used to shape sexualities research and to investigate health education practice. Using examples from research and health education, this module introduces these concepts and enables participants to explore how they may be applied.

Critical Sexualities Studies and Research Methodologies: This module provides an overview of the key issues associated with conducting research in Critical Sexuality Studies, including the ethical, social, and political complexities of studying sexuality, and the relationship between epistemology, methodology and method.

Kinship and Sexuality: This module examines relations between kinship and sexuality, exploring particularly how social and technological challenges to conventional family arrangements may confront dominant ethics of sexual propriety in different ways across different cultures.

Media and Sexuality: This module draws on contemporary theoretical work from the fields of media and cultural studies to consider the questions of who uses media, and how and why they use it. Its focus is on the variety of ways that media can be used to make sense of sex, sexuality and sexual health. It is also designed to introduce researchers and practitioners from a range of disciplines to the practice of textual analysis as a research methodology.

Sex, Sexuality and Gender: This module explores the social relationship between sex, sexuality and gender. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches from sociology, feminism and queer theory, the module argues that it is impossible to understand any one of these three terms without reference to the other two.

Sexual Rights in Pursuit of Sexual Justice: This module offers a critical overview of sexual rights and examines how sexual rights are currently understood, discussed and used. Questions are raised on whether sexual rights are sufficient to achieve sexual justice and whether the use of rights-based discourses have unintended consequences. What are the best strategies for using a rights-based discourse while avoiding negative consequences?

Sexuality and Christianity: This module identifies key themes that inform Christian thought, belief and practice about sexuality and offers concepts to consider other factors that influence the way in which Christian churches are engaging with contemporary issues that centre upon sexuality. The module also offers the opportunity for considering ways to engage positively with Christian communities on contemporary sexuality issues.

Sexuality in Islamic Societies: This module is intended to provide all participants with an insight into the dynamic relationship between Islam and sexuality.

Sexuality, Politics and Policy: This module looks at how sexuality is reflected and constrained in policy, in the application of policy, and in politics, at both a national and international level. The module will seek to explore debates around the range of policies which are related to sexuality. It will show how policy is changeable, but generally reflects the prevailing values and power relations in any given society or forum. It also looks at how sexuality as an issue can be used for other political ends.

Sexuality, the Body and Personhood: Sex and sexuality have long been assumed to be inextricably linked with the physical and social body. Notions of the body and personhood are therefore endowed with the ability either to constrain or to broaden notions of sexuality. This module is designed to introduce participants to the ways in which understandings of the body and personhood, as socially constructed, intersect with understandings and experiences of sexuality. The module is designed to produce a conversation between social theory and lived realities. It aims to enhance participants’ critical and theoretically informed understanding of the body, personhood, and sexuality and to develop their ability to apply this knowledge meaningfully in their own social or professional contexts.

The Social Construction of Sexual Identities: This module introduces participants to critical perspectives on sexual identity from a social constructionist perspective. In particular, these approaches critique common assumptions about ‘natural’, trans-historical or universal sexuality and identify a range of factors at work in the constitution of sexual subjectivities in social and cultural context. The module encourages participants to analyse these factors particularly in relation to processes associated with globalisation. The effects of globalisation mean that the character and limits of ‘local cultural contexts’ are increasingly open and uncertain. This has implications for how we think about sexual identity and sexuality more broadly.

Thinking about Men and Masculinity: Masculinity has become a problem. By this we mean that the concept of masculinity is now used in widely differing ways to problematise issues relating to men and boys, but stands as an accepted category of scholarly inquiry and political endeavour. Once, masculinity was regarded as merely a set of attributes or a quality that a man or boy had more or less of. Yet, in the media, at the UN and academic conferences, and more recently in policy development in health care, education, international development, welfare and justice, masculinity has become the conceptual framework for trying to understand a set of longstanding, if newly recognised, social issues. This module explores these issues and relates them specifically to questions of sexuality.

Translating Sexuality: This module starts by extending an understanding of ‘translation’ beyond word-for-word replacement (the traditional, basic understanding of translation) and into consideration of receipt of all acts of communicative intent as acts of translation, in which meaning can shift focus or change entirely. Three types of translation will be considered; translation between languages (interlingual); within languages (intralingual) and translation of non-verbal communicative acts. How are meanings of ‘sex’ or ‘sexuality’ transmitted within each of these spheres—and what meanings may get lost, or be added, in the process of translation? How does the dominance of English as a lingua franca of sexuality studies affect pre-existing understandings of sexual desire, sexual practice or sexual identities?

Young People and Sexuality: This module takes as its starting point the position that understandings of concepts such as ‘sexuality’ and ‘youth’ are socially and culturally constructed, examining the relationships between this construction of meaning and the ways in which we understand and respond to sexuality and young people.

2) Adapted short course modules delivered in Lima, Peru, February 2011, in Spanish.

Here is the list of the course documentation. Every module contains the module academic only.  If you want to access the complete files and download them, please log in with your IASSCS profile.

- Introducción

- Sexo, sexualidad y género: conceptos básicos

- Sexualidad, cuerpo y persona

- Construcción social de las identidades sexuales

- Parentesco y sexualidad

- Hombres y masculinidades

- Derechos sexuales y búsqueda de justicia social

- Políticas de la sexualidad y políticas públicas

- Metodologías de investigación en estudios críticos de la sexualidad

3) Adapted modules delivered on April 2011 in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Here is the list of the course documentation. Every module contains the module outline, the facilitator notes, the module academic content and the module handouts.  If you want to access the complete files and download them, please log in with your IASSCS profile.

- Introduction

- Sex, Sexuality and Gender. Basic concepts

- Biopower and Sexuality

- The Social Construction of Sexual Identities

- Sexuality, Politics and Policy

- Sexuality, the Body and Personhood

- Media and Sexuality

- Sexual rights in Pursue of Sexual justice

4) HIV/AIDS modules delivered on October 2011 in Durban, South Africa.

Here is the list of the course documentation. Every module contains the module outline, the facilitator notes, the module academic content and the module handouts.  If you want to access the complete files and download them, please log in with your IASSCS profile.

- Introduction

- Sex, Sexuality and Gender. Basic Concepts

- Sexuality and Masculinity

- HIV/AIDS and Sexuality

- Gender, Sexuality and Culture

- Young People and Sexuality

- Critical Sexuality Studies and Research Methodologies

- Sexual Rights and Politics

- Media and Sexuality

- The Social Construction of Sexual Orientation & Identities

 

IASSCS, La Trobe University and the Ford Foundation take no responsibility for adaptations of ASSC not certified by IASSCS directly or not available on the IASSCS website.