General Information

 

 

About the Conference

In 1997, IASSCS’s first conference was in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, focused on the topic of boundaries in sexuality education, research and advocacy. For IASSCS’s 20th anniversary conference to be held in Bangkok, Thailand, we return to the topic of boundaries to think about the ways that borders and horizons – in areas as diverse as the academy, advocacy, politics, and health – continue to shape our approaches to sex, gender, and sexuality and invite creativity and deconstruction in the years to come. Thus, we invite sessions, individual papers and posters that consider the following conference sub-themes:

  1. Boundaries in global research: What does it mean to work on sex, gender, reproduction, health and rights in a globalizing world? What issues are necessarily cross-border matters – labor or sex trafficking, migration flows, sexual violence in conflict, etc. – and what strategies are useful for producing knowledge about them?
  2. Boundaries in research: What barriers stand in the way of global research and scientifically-based interventions, and how might some of those barriers be transcended in practice?
  3. Boundaries of sexual rights struggles: How have governments and activists siloed work on LGBTIQ issues, sex work, abortion and reproductive rights, and other sexual rights struggles? Where is it productive to advocate for sexual rights separately and why might advocates insist on a holistic sexual rights agenda?
  4. Boundaries of sexual rights movements: In what ways do geopolitical and ideological boundaries shape sexual rights advocacy? How do North-South funding streams, regional governance structures, academic institutions, and advocacy coalitions affect the substance of sexual rights work?
  5. Boundaries in reproductive health and well being, autonomy of women and girls over their bodies, desire and reproduction (abortion, contraception and related rights for women, families, and communities): Why have these rights declined in most parts of the world, even as LGBTIQ rights have advanced and broken new boundaries? What is the role of fundamentalism/fundamentalist religious groups and why have they gained so much terrain in setting boundaries on reproductive and sexual rights, especially for women and girls? Why do they have such a strong influence on governments when it comes to sexual rights?
  6. Boundaries in politics, sexual and gender identity struggles: How are problems related to research and education on sexuality and sexual rights used in determining laws and rights, in identity struggles, and in national, regional and/or religious group formation?
  7. Boundaries in policymaking: When, if ever, should sexual rights movements embrace the state and its laws? Where has the state created space and protection for sexual rights, and where has this strategy backfired or produced unexpected outcomes?
  8. Boundaries in public health: Where are boundaries broken or successful in public health, and when does sound public health insist that boundaries stay intact for successful research and interventions? How do public health research and activist demands converge and diverge in areas like safer sex messaging, blood donation, pregnancy, abortion and family planning, the circulation and use of silicone, hormones, etc.?
  9. Boundaries in bodily autonomy: How do we think expansively about the violability and inviolability of the body? How are corporeal boundaries understood in academic and activist work with women, sex workers, survivors of sexual violence, transgender and intersex people, etc.? To the extent they are emphasized, what are the strengths and weaknesses of autonomy and consent as guiding principles for sexual rights struggles?
  10. Boundaries in art: How can art feed into/from other disciplines to inform current debates about sexuality? How can NGOs, policymakers, and advocates use art forms to further their discourses on sexuality, sexual practices, and sexual awareness? What happens when art crosses borders with medicine, psychology and psychiatry, and politics to elaborate upon the sexual? What are the trans/inter/cross-cultural shifts that take place? Do “artivist” discourses enhance or diminish artistic ones?
  11. Boundaries in media and communications technology: How have changes in media and communications technology shaped sexual behaviors, subjectivities, relationships, and communities? How have developments like the rise of social media, the increasing rapidity of global dissemination, and the intensification of surveillance aided in sexual liberation and repression? How do these developments change how we think about sexuality and solidarity in relation to entities like the nation-state, transnational capital, and an imagined global community of sexual rights supporters?

Host Organization

College of Public Health Sciences (CPHS), Chulalongkorn University

The College of Public Health Sciences (CPHS) was established since 2007 by merging between the Institute of Health Research and the College of Public Health, Chulalongkorn University. Our vision is “to be the University’s key academic resource in health and public health; to produce research knowledge that responds to, and helps solve, the country’s public health problems; to create high-quality academic products and services being accepted on an international level”. The College has proceeded in teaching at the graduate level (international program). The curriculum includes:

  1. Master of Public Health Program in Public Health
    (an international curriculum)
  2. Doctor of Philosophy Program in Public Health
    (an international curriculum)
  3. Master of Science Program in Public Health Sciences
    (an international curriculum)
  4. Doctor of Philosophy Program in Public Health Sciences
    (an international curriculum)

 

 

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The CPHS-CU has been accepted by WHO to serve as a WHO Center of Excellence, with an appointment to be a WHO Collaborating Center Representative (WHO CCR) in the following 2 areas: WHO Collaborating Center for Research and Training in Drug Dependence, and WHO Collaborating Center for Research and Training in Public Health Development. Each of these CCRs serves as a regional reference resource and training center.

 

 

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About Thailand

Thailand is situated in the heart of the Southeast Asian mainland. The population in Thailand is approximately 68 million, of which around 6 million live in the capital city, Bangkok.

Bangkok is a major Southeast Asian air hub, and dozens of airlines fly regularly between the Thai capital and Europe, Asia, the USA and Australia. Thailand’s national carrier is Thai Airways International, which also operates a number of domestic air routes. Foreign conference participants are adviced to book their flights to either to the main international airport Suvarnabhumi or to Don Muang Airport. It is strongly recommended that participants should arrive at Bangkok one day prior to the conference as well as depart Bangkok the day after the conference.

About IASSCS

The International Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (IASSCS) was founded in 1997 in Amsterdam, with the commitment to build equity in research capacity worldwide and to develop a broad range of multidisciplinary research activities in the social and cultural study of sexuality. Legally incorporated in 2008 as an independent organization in Peru, the organization is administered by an elected Board of Directors and a Secretariat, based in Lima, who in conjunction, oversee the implementation and coordination of IASSCS program activities.

Since 1997, IASSCS has hosted ten successful conferences which consolidated a solid network of scholars and advocates engaged in the social and cultural study of sexuality around the globe.  Conference participants have represented diverse disciplines including anthropology, history, sociology, health policy, and the humanities, as well as from cultural and gender studies. Further, the IASSCS network has brought together scholars, researchers, policy makers and activists, with substantial participation from the global south. These biennial conferences serve as a significant venue in the creation and strengthening of sexuality networks and coalitions across disciplines, professions and regions. Its last conference in Dublin gathered over 300 participants from 47 countries.

IASSCS’ mission is to strengthen both research and the capacity to conduct research, on socio-cultural dimensions of sexuality, with special attention to promoting research equity in the global south. It is committed to a broad range of research activities, including strengthening communication and promoting collaboration among researchers, policy makers, and activists/advocates. This mission is informed by the principles of social justice and human rights, with a focus on sexual rights and gender equality, as expressed in documents such as the Cairo Programme of Action, CEDAW and the UNGASS Declaration on HIV/AIDS.

 

 

IASSCS’ mission is to strengthen both research and the capacity to conduct research, on socio-cultural dimensions of sexuality, with special attention to promoting research equity in the global south. It is committed to a broad range of research activities, including strengthening communication and promoting collaboration among researchers, policy makers, and activists/advocates. This mission is informed by the principles of social justice and human rights, with a focus on sexual rights and gender equality, as expressed in documents such as the Cairo Programme of Action, CEDAW and the UNGASS Declaration on HIV/AIDS.

  • 20 years, 10 conferences, 10 cities, over 3,000 participants