X IASSCS CONFERENCE

literacies and sexualities
in cultural, fictional,
real, and virtual worlds:
past, present, future perfect?



We are glad to announce that the tenth biennial meeting of the International Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (IASSCS) is entitled:


and will take place on


This conference is co-organized by SALIS
and hosted by Jean-Philippe Imbert

The X IASSCS Conference proposes to investigate the politics, nature, roles and effects of sexual (and gender) literacy in the cultural, fictional, real and virtual worlds. If literacy is the ability to read, write and make some sense of life and existence, sexual literacy is the ability to make some sense of the symbol systems relevant to the understanding and use of the concepts of sexuality, and of its inextricable intertwining with gender and all other oppressed and excluded identities. Through history, this sense-making is perpetually contingent, context-dependent, politically charged, highly contested and played out on national and international stages through policy and protest.
A sexual literacy that sees and welcomes a history of non-normative sexualities and gender can, and often is, framed as cultural heresy. Issues of sexual literacy are also taken on-board by the different protagonists in the health and medical worlds, which always inform cultural, ethical, legal and political discourses. Finally, artistic discourses (… architecture… literature… music… visual arts… performance arts…) belonging to high or popular cultures also endeavour to make sense of sex, sexualities and gender by providing a wide gamut of hermeneutical discourses. All these are different means of making sense of sexuality and of gender, in sites from classrooms to streets, from stages to senates.





* All deadlines refer to 24:00 hrs (midnight) on the given date in your local time zone or, if different, the time zone of the country that you are submitting from (this also includes applications, bookings, registrations and other conference activities). No submissions for any part of the conference will be accepted after this time.



CONTACT INFORMATION

Conference Information: 2015conference@iasscs.org

General Information: iasscs.secretariat@iasscs.org







"Literacies and Sexualities in Cultural, Fictional, Real, and Virtual Worlds: Past, Present, Future Perfect?"





  • This strand proposes to look into the structures and discourses surrounding the organization processes and challenges of inclusive activist spaces by exploring the intersections of our privileges and oppression.

    Indicative key words: Challenges, demonstrations, equality, freedom, online activism, organisations, power, privileges and oppression, riots, social debates, structures.


  • This strand will provide a forum for analysis of cultural issues related to sexual relationships and sexual behavior, in order to explore the question of why and how, at different moments in history, certain scientific and cultural scenarios, and the sexual and gender roles they variously prescribe—or, indeed, violently impose—have acquired viability and/or continue to exert authority over possible modes of human being and becoming.

    Indicative key words: Authority, behavioural patterns, being and becoming, cultural discourses, gender performance and performativity; gender, sexuality and social classes; history, power, normativity and non-normativity, public feelings, science and culture.


  • In this strand, we propose to focus upon the relationship between education and sexuality, looking at how sexuality is presented and discussed in pedagogical material, and how the many facets of sexuality-related matters can be an inherent component of the reality which is the classroom, and of its theoretical framework provided by curriculum-designing structures.

    Indicative key words: Access to education, bullying, capabilities, classroom situations, curriculum development, schools and the law, schools and clergies, parents and schools, pedagogical behaviours, pedagogical material, philosophies of education, pupils and teachers.


  • This strand will focus on how the law has dealt with, applied to, and been enforced on issues relating to sexuality, and how sexual orientation influences the application of legal rules to individuals in our society. The strand will also address the role of the law in shaping the social meaning of sexuality, and how legal rights, protections, and deprivations have evolved based on identities as heterosexual, LGBT in a number of contexts.

    Indicative key words: Armies and police forces, children and states, deprivation, governmental structures, laws and legistations, policy-making, prisons and punishments, power and counter power, prostitution debates, rules, services and training, sex trafficking, social and physical protection.


  • According to WHO, Sexual Health is “a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity”. This strand proposes to look at how sexual literacy is a core component of all the disciplines belonging to Health Studies to aim at a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence.

    Indicative key words: Access to health, age studies, the business of health, disability studies, health awareness, health cultures, health covers, patients and professionals, stigmas, NGOs, violence, well-being.


  • In this strand, we will focus on what were in the past and what are today the dominant scientific and cultural discourses that at once enable(d) and enforce(d) different types of human beings to perform and incorporate their respective gender and sexual identities, whether normative or “deviant,” in specific, socio-historically changing ways.

    Indicative key words: Cyber identities, enablement and empowerment, gender and sexual identities, identity formation, norms and deviance, power, private and public identities, socio-history, sexual attraction and courting.


  • This strand will focus on how the field of language and sexuality has gained importance within socio-culturally oriented linguistic scholarship, looking at the close relationship between literacy, gender and sexuality. The concept of language is understood as the outcome of intersubjectively negotiated practices and ideologies, and includes semiotic, cultural or non-semiotic languages, such as body languages’, for instance.

    Indicative key words: Body language, cyberlanguages, genders and languages, ideologies, languages and taboos, linguistics, languages and lingoes, negotiated practices, power, semiotic and non-semiotic languages, lies, sexuality and translation, sign language, the said and the unsaid.


  • Art and Literature interrogate the ways in which sexuality is conceptualized and constructed, often with the intention of deconstructing essentialist notions of sexuality and identity formation. In this strand, it is proposed to look at how, while recent theoretical interventions have re-situated sexuality as a historical and social category––allowing us to see how ideas about sexuality are linked to forms of power and other hegemonic categories of identity and subjectivity––sexuality remains a contentious subject within most artistic arenas. Debates surrounding the politics and problems of sexual freedom, choice and pleasure still proliferate and address the issue of the pervasiveness of moral panics concerning the sexualisation or ‘pornographication’ of Western cultures in all types of arts, from drag and cabaret, to music and literature, via fashion and advertising.

    Indicative key words: Art and therapies, artistic propagandas, avant-garde art, artistic canons and sexuality, censorship, freedom of expression, moral panics, pleasure, political discourses of the arts, power, representations of sexuality, underground art movements, satire.


  • In this strand, we will ask the following questions: What are the effects of the media’s portrayal of sexuality on viewers’ sexual lives? Is the discourse on sexuality provided by the media normative, or formative? How do new media take on-board the discourses on sexuality, and are these discourses affected by the new media, how do the new media provide a sort of new literacy for the understanding of sexuality?

    Indicative key words: Censorship and sexuality in the media, internet and sexuality, media discourses, media audiences, neoliberalism and sexuality discourses, sexuality and terrorism in the media.







Since admitting its first students in 1980, Dublin City University has grown in both student numbers and size and now occupies a 72 acre site in Glasnevin, just north of Dublin city centre and close to the airport. To date, over 43,000 students have graduated from DCU and are now playing significant roles in enterprise and business globally.



Today, in 2013, DCU delivers more than 120 programmes to over 10,000 students across its four faculties – Humanities and Social Sciences, Science and Health, Engineering and Computing and DCU Business School. DCU’s excellence is recognised internationally and it is ranked among the top 50 Universities worldwide (QS ‘Top 50 under 50’ 2012). In the last eight years, DCU has twice been named Sunday Times ‘University of the Year’. DCU has also risen in the 2012/2013 QS World University Rankings for the second year running, the only Irish university to do so. DCU climbed two places and is one of only three Irish universities to have achieved an increased rating in this prestigious world rankings table. Dublin City University was recently invited to join the prestigious European university network, the European Consortium of Innovative Universities (ECIU).

DCU is the only Irish university to be represented in this network of 11 European universities and three associate partners, from Australia, Mexico and Russia, all of whom share a common commitment to innovation. In 2010 the first MA in Sexuality Studies (MASS) and the first Research centre in Sexuality Studies (EROSS) on the island of Ireland (http://www.dcu.ie/eross/index.shtml) were created. Other Irish Universities had Women Studies, but there were no heterosexual studies, LGBT studies, masculinity studies, queer studies, or any all-encompassing cross-disciplinary research centre in Sexuality Studies. Both MASS and EROSS are running well, are generating PhDs, research, and sexuality-related activities through conferences, presence on Irish media and links with foreign institutions, in Europe, Asia, Africa and America.






Ireland, and Dublin in particular, is recognised internationally and regarded as a very popular and interesting destination, with unparalleled hospitality and beauty of scenery. This reputation leads in general to increased conference attendance, both of delegates and accompanying persons.

Ireland is ideally situated in Europe with good access from all parts of the world. It is especially attractive for North Americans as the natural gateway into Europe, and is very close to the UK with great travel connections.


The island's geography comprises relatively low-lying mountains surrounding a central plain, with several navigable rivers extending inland. The island has lush vegetation, a product of its mild but changeable oceanic climate, which avoids extremes in temperature. Thick woodlands covered the island until the Middle Ages. As of 2013, the amount of land that is wooded in Ireland is about 11% of the total, compared with a European average of 35%.



Irish culture has had a significant influence on other cultures, especially in the fields of literature and, to a lesser degree, science and education. Alongside mainstream Western culture, a strong indigenous culture exists, as expressed for example through Gaelic games, Irish music, and the Irish language. The culture of the island has also several features shared with Great Britain, including the English language, and sports such as association football, rugby, horse racing and golf.



Demonym Irish
Population 6,378,000 (as of 2011)
Density 73.4/km2 (190.1/sg mi)
Ethnic Groups 96.4% White
1.7% Asian
1.1% Black
0.8% Other
More information http://www.discoverireland.ie





The International Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (IASSCS) was founded in 1997 in Amsterdam, with the commitment to build equity in research capacity worldwide and to develop a broad range of multidisciplinary research activities in the social and cultural study of sexuality. Legally incorporated in 2008 as an independent organization in Peru, the organization is administered by an elected Board of Directors and a Secretariat.



Since 1997, IASSCS has hosted nine successful conferences which consolidated a solid network of scholars and advocates engaged in the social and cultural study of sexuality around the globe. Conference participants have represented diverse disciplines including anthropology, history, sociology, health policy, and the humanities, as well as from cultural and gender studies. Furthermore, the IASSCS network has brought together scholars, researchers, policy makers and activists, with substantial participation from the global south. These biennial conferences serve as a significant venue in the creation and strengthening of sexuality networks and coalitions across disciplines, professions and regions. Its last conference in Buenos Aires gathered over 321 participants from 40 countries.

IASSCS’ mission is to strengthen both research and the capacity to conduct research, on socio-cultural dimensions of sexuality, with special attention to promoting research equity in the global south. It is committed to a broad range of research activities, including strengthening communication and promoting collaboration among researchers, policy makers, and activists/advocates. This mission is informed by the principles of social justice and human rights, with a focus on sexual rights and gender equality.


Online registration through your IASSCS profile is now available!



Conference registration is done online. To register, please go to your IASSCS Profile section (top right hand corner of your screen) and follow the instructions. The registration fee includes entry to all conference sessions, the exhibition and poster area, the cocktail and the opening and closing sessions. Delegates are also entitled to receive a conference bag and other conference materials including the conference programme, the USB flash drive with all Conference abstracts. Conference bags and conference materials will not be mailed to delegates. All assistants will receive a conference certificate through email. Registration fee includes a IASSCS 2-year membership.



IASSCS commitment to equity reflects on the 2015 IASSCS Conference registration fees ensuring that participation is affordable whatever income levels are. In that sense, and trying to encourage the participation of all interested persons, we are applying a differential rate structure based on the user’s available living allowance.



Available living allowance per year Standard Fee Late Fee
(From 1st April 2015)
Bellow US$ 10,000 US$ 150 US$ 200
US$ 10,001 - 30,000 US$ 200 US$ 250
US$ 30,001 - 50,000 US$ 300 US$ 350
US$ 50,001 and above US$ 400 US$ 450




In the event that the conference cannot be held or is postponed due to events beyond the control of the conference organizers (force majeure) or due to events which are not attributable to wrongful intent or gross negligence of the conference organizers, the conference organizers cannot be held liable by delegates for any damages, costs, or losses incurred, such as transportation costs, accommodation costs, financial losses, etc.


Under these circumstances, the conference organizers reserve the right to either retain the entire registration fee and to use it for a future conference, or to reimburse the delegate after deducting the costs already incurred for the organization of the conference and which could not be recovered from third parties.






The goal of IASSCS Abstract Mentoring Program is to provide an opportunity for young and/or less experienced abstract submitters from the South to receive feedback from more experienced researchers prior to the submission of their abstract to the X IASSCS Conference.












Before you can submit an abstract, you need to create a IASSCS profile from which you can access the abstract submission online system. Please remember that once your abstract has been submitted, no modifications can be made.



The abstract sub-theme category is the general heading under which your abstract will be reviewed and included in a session, if selected. When filling in your Abstract Submission Form, please choose the two categories which best describes the subject of your abstract.


  • This strand proposes to look into the structures and discourses surrounding the organization processes and challenges of inclusive activist spaces by exploring the intersections of our privileges and oppression.

    Indicative key words: Challenges, demonstrations, equality, freedom, online activism, organisations, power, privileges and oppression, riots, social debates, structures.

  • This strand will provide a forum for analysis of cultural issues related to sexual relationships and sexual behavior, in order to explore the question of why and how, at different moments in history, certain scientific and cultural scenarios, and the sexual and gender roles they variously prescribe— or, indeed, violently impose—have acquired viability and/or continue to exert authority over possible modes of human being and becoming.

    Indicative key words: Authority, behavioural patterns, being and becoming, cultural discourses, gender performance and performativity; gender, sexuality and social classes; history, power, normativity and non-normativity, public feelings, science and culture.

  • In this strand, we propose to focus upon the relationship between education and sexuality, looking at how sexuality is presented and discussed in pedagogical material, and how the many facets of sexuality-related matters can be an inherent component of the reality which is the classroom, and of its theoretical framework provided by curriculum-designing structures.

    Indicative key words: Access to education, bullying, capabilities, classroom situations, curriculum development, schools and the law, schools and clergies, parents and schools, pedagogical behaviours, pedagogical material, philosophies of education, pupils and teachers.

  • This strand will focus on how the law has dealt with, applied to, and been enforced on issues relating to sexuality, and how sexual orientation influences the application of legal rules to individuals in our society. The strand will also address the role of the law in shaping the social meaning of sexuality, and how legal rights, protections, and deprivations have evolved based on identities as heterosexual, LGBT in a number of contexts.

    Indicative key words: Armies and police forces, children and states, deprivation, governmental structures, laws and legistations, policy-making, prisons and punishments, power and counter power, prostitution debates, rules, services and training, sex trafficking, social and physical protection.

  • According to WHO, Sexual Health is “a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity”. This strand proposes to look at how sexual literacy is a core components of all the disciplines belonging to Health Studies to aim at a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence.

    Indicative key words: Access to health, age studies, the business of health, disability studies, health awareness, health cultures, health covers, patients and professionals, stigmas, NGOs, violence, well-being.

  • In this strand, we will focus on what were in the past and what are today the dominant scientific and cultural discourses that at once enable(d) and enforce(d) different types of human beings to perform and incorporate their respective gender and sexual identities, whether normative or “deviant,” in specific, socio-historically changing ways.

    Indicative key words: Cyber identities, enablement and empowerment, gender and sexual identities, identity formation, norms and deviance, power, private and public identities, socio-history, sexual attraction and courting.

  • This strand will focus on how the field of language and sexuality has gained importance within socio-culturally oriented linguistic scholarship, looking at the close relationship between literacy, gender and sexuality. The concept of language is understood as the outcome of intersubjectively negotiated practices and ideologies, and includes semiotic, cultural or non-semiotic languages, such as body languages’, for instance.

    Indicative key words: Body language, cyberlanguages, genders and languages, ideologies, languages and taboos, linguistics, languages and lingoes, negotiated practices, power, semiotic and non-semiotic languages, lies, sexuality and translation, sign language, the said and the unsaid.

  • Art and Literature interrogate the ways in which sexuality is conceptualized and constructed, often with the intention of deconstructing essentialist notions of sexuality and identity formation. In this strand, it is proposed to look at how, while recent theoretical interventions have re-situated sexuality as a historical and social category––allowing us to see how ideas about sexuality are linked to forms of power and other hegemonic categories of identity and subjectivity––sexuality remains a contentious subject within most artistic arenas. Debates surrounding the politics and problems of sexual freedom, choice and pleasure still proliferate and address the issue of the pervasiveness of moral panics concerning the sexualisation or ‘pornographication’ of Western cultures in all types of arts, from drag and cabaret, to music and literature, via fashion and advertising.

    Indicative key words: Art and therapies, artistic propagandas, avant-garde art, artistic canons and sexuality, censorship, freedom of expression, moral panics, pleasure, political discourses of the arts, power, representations of sexuality, underground art movements, satire.

  • In this strand, we will ask the following questions: What are the effects of the media’s portrayal of sexuality on viewers’ sexual lives? Is the discourse on sexuality provided by the media normative, or formative? How do new media take on-board the discourses on sexuality, and are these discourses affected by the new media, how do the new media provide a sort of new literacy for the understanding of sexuality?

    Indicative key words: Censorship and sexuality in the media, internet and sexuality, media discourses, media audiences, neoliberalism and sexuality in the media, normativity, propagandistic discourses, sexuality and terrorism in the media.



The X IASSCS Conference offers three options for abstract submission:


A small number of presentations may be offered the possibility of presenting in poster format.


To help with your abstract submission, please ensure you follow the general guidelines:


Submit your abstract online through the Abstract Submission form by November 10th, 2014.



We invite the submission of abstracts and proposals for the following:



All abstracts submitted to the conference will go through a blind, peer-reviewed process carried out by an international review panel. Each abstract will be reviewed by no fewer than two reviewers and the final selection of abstracts will be done by members of the Academic Committee.


Successful abstracts will be included as oral or poster presentations in the Conference program. The Academic Committee will conclude whether an abstract will be presented as oral presentation or poster presentation depending on session’s confirmation and space availability.



Accepted abstracts will appear on an USB flash drive with all conference abstracts and on the Conference website.



Notification of acceptance will be sent to the corresponding author in early February 2015. Please note that it is the responsibility of the corresponding author to inform all co-authors of the outcome of their submission. Authors whose abstracts have been accepted will receive presentation details by the end of March 2015.







The International Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (IASSCS) is committed to making its Conferences accessible to all , particularly participants from the Global South (i.e. people from Latin America; Central, South and South-East; The Pacific; Eastern Europe; Africa and the Middle East) who are working in sexuality-related fields or who are studying human sexuality.


IASSCS will award a limited number of competitive scholarships to assist as many people as possible with the limited resources available, thanks to support received from our sponsors (i.e. The Ford Foundation).








Go to your IASSCS profile and then click on the Scholarship Application Form section. Please, fill in all the required information (all fields marked with an * are mandatory). Please take into account that you cannot return to the application form after you have submitted it to change any details, so please ensure you adequately complete it the first time. After submitting your scholarship application, a confirmation number will automatically appear on the screen. You will also receive a confirmation message to the e-mail account given in your Conference profile. Please, have in mind that this e-mail is the only guarantee that you have successfully submitted your scholarship application.


Take into account that you cannot return to the application form after you have submitted it to change any details, so please ensure you adequately complete it the first time. Remember that full or partial scholarships will be granted only if your abstract was accepted for X IASSCS Conference.


Please, remember that every IASSCS grantee will be required to cover the cost of the hotel incidental expenses, visa applications and other optional extra expenses, for example travel insurance.


Applicants may apply for the IASSCS Scholarships and the IASSCS Post-Conference Fellowship, if they so wish.


Applications are available from September 1st to November 10th, 2014.


Deadline for applying to IASSCS Conference Scholarship is November 24th, 2014.




We are pleased to announce the VI IASSCS Post-Conference Training taking place in Dublin, Ireland, June 21st to 26th, 2015.


The IASSCS Post Conference training is the Sexuality Studies Summer School which directly follows each IASSCS conference, and is co-organised by IASSCS and the University hosting the conference.

The School of Applied Language and Intercultural Studies (SALIS) and IASSCS are pleased to announce that the 2015 SALIS/IASSCS Sexuality Studies Summer School will be held from Monday 22 June 2015 to Friday 26 June 2015 in Dublin City University, Ireland.



This advanced training course offers a multi-facetted yet coherent programme of study from an interdisciplinary perspective. Participants will be invited to engage in ongoing theoretical and advocacy debates, in artistic/cultural discourses on sexuality and on political controversies regarding sexuality and gender, as well as to examine key issues and topics of research in sexuality, such as sexual and reproductive health, sexual identities and practices, social mobilization around sexuality, and sexual rights.



The Post-Conference training (PCT) is intended for graduate students (PhD and MA students) in the social sciences, humanities, and other disciplines, currently working on sexuality studies. To be eligible, applicants must have an abstract (for a paper or poster) submitted at the X IASSCS Conference, and be available to stay in Dublin for the full conference and training course. Applicants must also be fully proficient in English.




This PCT Sexuality Studies Summer School is organized by SALIS at Dublin City University and IASSCS. The 2015 edition is coordinated by Tina Kinsella and Jean-Philippe Imbert (both Dublin City University). Several renowned international scholars, activists and professionals from various disciplines will be teaching at the Summer School.



The SALIS/IASSCS PCT Sexuality Studies Summer School 2015 will be hosted by Dublin City University, Ireland. Students can avail of DCU Accommodation.



The tuition fee is 800.00 US Dollars. This includes tuition, digital reading materials and the social programme.

Arrangements like accommodation, food, transportation and living expenses will be catered for depending on the type of registration.



Plan A: US Dollars 800.00 (includes tuition, digital reading materials and the social programme)

Plan B: US Dollars 1,100.00 (includes plan A plus meals)

Plan C: US Dollars 1,220.00 (includes plan A plus accommodation)

Plan D: US Dollars 1,500.00 (includes plan A plus accommodation and meals)




IASSCS provides very limited assistance to cover full and partial expenses of participants in this programme. To apply for full or partial fellowship participants should also be presenting their work at the IASSCS conference.

The IASSCS Post-Conference fellowship covers one or more of the following:


The deadline to apply for fellowships is January 26th, 2015

We encourage you to look for additional sources of funding


Note: Applicants may apply for both the IASSCS Post-Conference training fellowship and the IASSCS Conference scholarship. If applying for the training fellowship only, applicants will be responsible for their Conference-related expenses before the training begins.





IASSCS offers an award for the best paper presented during the conference to early-career researchers. The prize consists of US$ 500 (Five Hundred U.S. Dollars) and an award certificate. One will be offered to an oral presentation and one will be for a poster.

Additionally, the journal Culture, Health and Sexuality will also offer a prize to the author of the best paper by a ‘newcomer’ to research in the field of sexuality, culture and health.


To be considered for these awards:




Deadline for submitting application and full paper:
April 30th, 2015.


The Awards Committee will review candidate papers and their decision will be announced during the Conference Closing Ceremony on Saturday 20th June, 2015.


If you have any further questions,
please contact us at 2015conference@iasscs.org



In line with IASSCS’ mission, the X IASSCS Programme seeks to promote links between researchers, academics, advocates and activists. In doing so, the X IASSCS Programme will be addressing the process of taking theory into practice, conceptualizing the meaning and significance of advocacy at the national and community level, and supporting and advancing the implementation of sexual rights.


Sessions will focus on the relevance to investigate the politics, nature, roles and effects of sexual (and gender) literacy in the cultural, fictional, real and virtual worlds. The conference will feature abstract-driven parallel sessions, plenary sessions, roundtables and professional development workshops, as well as independently organized satellite meetings. Please note that delegates can submit proposals under different formats. Delegates can either opt to use an academic format for their presentation, or can also offer abstract for presentation of varied artistic or cultural means of expressions: photography, mixed media, video, installations, performances, interventions in public spaces, art exhibitions, design, or audio presentations audios. These proposals will go under the Cultural Program of the event, which is a fundamental aspect of IASSCS Conferences. All submissions must be done online.


Plenary sessions:

Plenary sessions bring all conference participants together in one large session. Each plenary session includes two to four speakers drawn from the world’s most distinguished researchers, community leaders and policy specialists who address and discuss the conference main topics.

Exhibit presentations (posters and exhibits):

The exhibits will present in graphic format (photographic display, mixed media, video, installations, performances, and intervention in public spaces, among others) research results, artistic initiatives and/or analytical reflections based on activist or mobilizing experiences previously conducted.

Morning and afternoon parallel sessions
(oral presentations):


Parallel sessions are based on research abstracts submitted from around the world, which have been peer-reviewed by a panel of international reviewers and selected for presentation by the Academic Program Sub- Committee. Each session includes 4 – 5 speakers, who will each make a fifteen minute presentation, followed by a short discussion. Audience questions will be encouraged and facilitated by the session coordinator.

CONFERENCE MATERIAL


Below you will find the Conference material generated during the 2015 IASSCS Conference:


  • Here is the 2015 IASSCS Conference Executive Report.
  • Please, click here to read the conference abstracts.
  • You can take a glimpse of the conference highlights here.
  • Please, click here if you want to read the conference booklet, containing all the parallel sessions and presenters.
  • Here you can download the 2015 conference flyer.
  • You can read the tweets generated during the conference by following the hashtags #iasscs2015and #iasscs.
  • We would like to present the IASSCS award winners!
    • IASSCS Paper Award was granted to Andrew Westle, for his paper entitled When Men Dance: Contesting Normative Sexualities through Movement.
    • IASSCS Poster Award was granted to two presentations: a) Fabiola Trejo, for her poster entitled Attitudes towards Sexual Permissiveness in three Different States of Mexico; b) Robert Lawlor, for his poster entitled The Virtuous Pedophile.
  • Do you want to read the conference in the news? Here is FLACSO Argentina (in Spanish) the Irish Forum for Global Health, Orla Parslow-Breen’s blog.
Programme at a Glance
Keynote Speakers

Meet our Keynote Speakers

  • Bibi Bakare-Yusuf is co-founder and publishing director of one of Africa’s leading publishing houses, Cassava Republic Press She has worked as an academic, as a gender and research consultant in the public, private and development sectors. She recently co-founded Tapestry Consulting, a boutique research and training company focused on gender, sexuality and transformational issues in Nigeria. Bibi is also a Yale World Fellow, a Desmond Tutu Fellow and a Frankfurt Book Fair Fellow.

    *Unfortunately, due to personal reasons, Bibi Bakare-Yusuf gave a last minute cancellation. The plenary session 2 was reorganized as follows:

    Sexuality at the Crossroads. A Conversation with IASSCS

    • Gary Dowsett (La Trobe University, IASSCS Founding Member, Australia)
    • Carlos Cáceres (Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, IASSCS Founding Member, Peru)
    • Frans Mom (Independent Consultant, IASSCS Member, The Netherlands)
    • Diane di Mauro (Academic Director, Summer Institute on Sexuality, Culture and Society, University of Amsterdam, IASSCS Member, United States of America)
    • Horacio Sívori (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, IASSCS Member, Brazil) Chair: Jean-Philippe Imbert (Dublin City University, Ireland)


  • “Promoting Men's Sexual Literacy on Campus: Pornography, Hooking Up, and Sexual Assault”

    Part of being a man is, of course, to know everything there is to know about sex and to be a self-proclaimed expert in all matters sexual. But where do men learn about sex and what do they know? And what don't they know? In this presentation I will use evidence from several different studies to discuss the role of pornography as a form of sex education; "hooking up" as the mode of sexual discourse among college students; and, practical and discursive strategies to prevent sexual assault.

    Michael Kimmel is SUNY Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University in New York. He is the director of the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities. His books include The gender of desire, sexualities, men confront pornography, and the best-seller, Guyland.

    Respondent: Debbie Ging, Dublin City University, Ireland.

    You can attend Michael Kimmel’s presentation on Friday 19th June, at 16:00 hrs.


  • “Seeking oneself, finding the other”

    Telling one’s story is of course an act of self-creation, but often, while reading or listening to the stories of others, one discovers aspects of oneself - with revulsion perhaps (surely that's not me!); sometimes with gratitude; or else, with surprised delight, recognizing a friend in a stranger. Through the reading of different kinds of autobiographies and biographies, and the telling of some stories of my own, I hope to weave an uneven tapestry of tales about sexuality and the self – a fluid and historically variable sexuality; a self-located provisionally at the interstices of communities, nation, histories and times.

    Nivedita Menon is Professor at Centre for Comparative Politics and Political Theory, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi. Her books include Seeing like a Feminist (2012), Recovering Subversion: Feminist Politics beyond the Law (2004) and a book co-written with Aditya Nigam Power and Contestation: India after 1989 (2007). She also has two edited volumes Gender and Politics in India 1999) and Sexualities (2007).

    Respondent: Ailbhe Smyth, Ireland.

    You can attend Nivedita Menon’s presentation on Saturday 20th June, at 10:00 hrs.

Special Guests

We also are delighted to announce the presence of several Irish personalities at the X IASSCS Conference


  • Gráinne Healy is a long time feminist activist with serious involvement in campaign for women's rights in Ireland, including reproductive health rights, violence against women, prostitution and trafficking and anti poverty issues. Chair of the European Women's Lobby's Observatory on Violence against Women for over a decade, Gráinne is also former Vice President of the European Women's Lobby, a former Chairwoman of the National Women's Council of Ireland; Chairwoman of the National Domestic Violence Intervention Agency and a previous Ministerial appointee to the Board of the Equality Authority and the Women's Health Council. She was Marriage Equality Chairwoman.

    Gráinne Healy will be giving the Closing Address on Saturday June 20th at 16:00 hrs


  • Renowned Joycean scholar and independent Senator, David Norris is also a gay and civil rights activist. David Norris is credited with having managed, almost single-handedly, to overthrow the anti-homosexuality law which brought about the downfall of Oscar Wilde. He is a former university lecturer and a member of the Oireachtas, serving in Seanad Éireann since 1987. He was the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in Ireland.

    David Norris will be announcing the winners of the IASSCS award during the Awards ceremony on Saturday June 20th at 17:00 hrs


  • Currently Special Rapporteur on Child Protection to the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, Geoffrey Shannon’s extensive list of reports cover amongst other topics such as Children and Internet Safety (2014); Forced Marriages (2015); Protecting Children from Children – Bullying (2012); Child Protection and Developments in International Law (2011); Trafficking of Children and Prostitution (2010); Child pornography (2008).

    Geoffrey Shannon will be delivering the Conference Opening Address, on Wednesday June 17th at 17:00 hrs.


  • Panti Bliss, also known as Rory O'Neill, is considered to be Dublin's foremost drag queen. In February 2014, she gave a speech on homophobia at the Abbey which garnered over 600,000 views. The latest tweets describe Panti as “pub landlady, performer, writer, speechifier, gender discombobulist and national fucking treasure”.

    Panti will be performing and running the Céili/Gayli on Friday June 19th, during IASSCS Cocktail Party.


Other Types of Participation

The IASSCS Programme encourages academics, researchers, activists and advocates to propose and participate in special presentations, workshops sessions and satellite meetings.



Roundtables are spaces that address a more narrowly defined topic than in a plenary session. Each participant will agree on a specific topic to discuss and debate. Each person is given equal right to participate; A&Q to follow. Please, fnid below the list of roundtables to be addressed at X IASSCS Conference:

Workshops are interactive and 'hands-on'. They will provide an in-depth review of (or introduction to) a topic of relevance to the conference theme, and typically provide participants with materials and/or ideas that are immediately useful for the participants. Workshops will ideally devote significant time to hands-on activities by the attendees. To these ends, workshop presenters should provide participants with workshop materials, in advance of and/or during the workshop. Please, find below the list of workshops to be delivered at X IASSCS Conference:


Institutional Fair contributes to dissemination of sexuality research and advocacy campaigns inviting university presses, advocacy groups, non governmental institutions and academic journals with publications, projects, programs, campaigns or interventions and publications related to the Conference themes are offered the opportunity to display their work and publications in the sexuality field. Two of the most important editorial houses will be at the conference:

Taylor and Francis Journals
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals

Reproductive Health Matters
http://www.rhmjournal.org.uk

IASSCS Institutional Meetings: throughout the conference, IASSCS holds open and closed meetings.




The venue for the X IASSCS International Conference 2015 will be Dublin City University (www.dcu.ie), hosted by Mr. Jean-Philippe Imbert and the School of Applied Language and Intercultural Studies (SALIS) at Dublin City University. DCU is situated on the North side of Dublin and features superb conference facilities and campus accommodation.


The campus is just 10 minutes transfer time from the airport and 15 minutes from Dublin city centre, and onsite facilities include a convenience store, pharmacy, bank, dining hall, bar and sports centre. The main conference building will be The Helix (www.thehelix.ie), with several on-campus conference rooms in the adjacent building for smaller breakout sessions and the Post-Conference Training Programme.




Some visitors to Ireland need a visa to enter the country. For information regarding the requirements for entrance into Ireland, please click here: https://www.dfa.ie/travel/visas/visas-for-ireland/


Here you can find a list of Irish Consulates and Embassies: https://www.dfa.ie/embassies/irish-embassies-abroad/



Arrival to Dublin:

Dublin is served by 39 airlines, with direct flights to over 190 destinations worldwide. The majority of these flights are provided by low-cost carriers. Dublin Airport is located just 10km from the city centre. In 2013, 6 airlines served North America and these routes and carriers are expanding in 2014. Dublin is additionally connected to Asia and Australasia through regular services to Dubai and Abhu Dhabi.


Dublin City:

Dublin is a breath of fresh air, a truly unique capital that’s steeped in tradition yet young at heart. In the historic, compact city centre there is lots to do and see, and visitors will love the rich selection of galleries, museums, restaurants, pubs and shops, not to mention the traditionally warm welcome from Dubliners.


Traditionally high visitor turnout:

World-renowned for our warm welcome and genuine sense of fun, the Irish people’s enviable passion for life promises to entice colleagues and peers from around the globe, guaranteeing high attendance at any international event.


Easy access:

Ireland, ideally located on the edge of Europe, is less than an hour from London, less than two hours from Paris or Brussels and just six hours from the east coast of the US by air. Dublin International Airport is only 10km from the city centre and the city itself is small and compact, and is tailor-made for carefree exploring by foot. It also has an excellent transport system, which includes an urban rail system (DART), a stylish new tram network (Luas) and an extensive citywide and national bus service. Taxis are plentiful and reasonably priced by international standards.


Safety:

Dublin is a safe and welcoming city. The city is one of the friendliest in Europe and maintains a relaxed and welcoming atmosphere.


Modern facilities:

In addition to the state of the art conference centre at DCU, Dublin offers superb hotel facilities and other modern facilities for delegates, speakers and exhibitors.


Convenience:

Ireland is English-speaking and part of the Euro zone. There are very few travel restrictions for delegates or exhibitors, and a beneficial tax regime for international conferences.


Value for money:

Recent consumer surveys and hotel price indicators show that the local costs of accommodation, taxis, restaurants, and many retail items continue to fall and represent extremely good value for our overseas visitors, with Ireland now one of the cheapest destinations in Europe. Flight access to Ireland is provided by low-cost airlines on many routes.




Please find a list of information regarding all the accommodation available on campus, some local hotels, plus information for travel to and from DCU.



Here are suggestions for accommodation in Dublin:


More information coming soon!